About the Area

Newcastle upon Tyne is the city and regional capital for a population of c2.5 million people across North East England.

Newcastle is a great city, once in the forefront of 19th century industrial innovation and now at the forefront of technical innovation, leisure and culture. It has a deserved reputation for being one of the friendliest and liveliest cities in Europe. In recent years Newcastle has been transformed into one of the most cosmopolitan cities in the country. You can see the evidence everywhere from the restored buildings in Grainger Town to the regenerated Quayside area. With 2,000 years of fascinating history, the city has fabulous classical Georgian architecture in sweeping streets, wonderful restaurants and cafes, traditional pubs and contemporary bars, along with live music and theatre.

National surveys often suggest that people in the north east enjoy a better quality of life than anywhere else in England. The region has beautiful countryside, friendly people and a low cost of living. Accommodation varies from central city and riverside, through suburban to the urban periphery, stretching into the counties of Northumberland and Durham.  Newcastle lies on the East Coast Mainline rail service, with regular services through to London. In addition the Metro light-rail service connects to stations throughout Tyne and Wear. The A1(M) runs close by, with links to the national motorway network. Newcastle is also well connected for air travel via Newcastle International Airport, and for sea travel to Europe via the International      Ferry Terminal.

A vibrant city

Newcastle upon Tyne is a vibrant and dynamic city brimming with energy. You are spoilt for choice whatever you enjoy – shopping, dining out or enjoying an evening of entertainment at one of the many theatres, cinemas and music venues across the region.

The Newcastle Bridge at the evening and blue sky
A sign above an entrance to the Central Arcade shopping centre in the city of Newcastle upon Tyne in the UK.

Central location

Our main sites are in the perfect central location, making that work life balance even easier to maintain. Whether that be nipping straight into the city centre after work to do some much needed shopping or heading to Jesmond for dinner with friends. The possibilities are endless.

A sign above an entrance to the Central Arcade shopping centre in the city of Newcastle upon Tyne in the UK.

Near to coast and countryside

Rolling hills and the forest of the Northumberland National Park reach north to the Scottish Border. England’s finest sand dune beaches and interesting fishing villages line the coast. Historic Hadrian’s Wall starts in Newcastle and runs to Carlisle and the Lake District.

Hadrian's Wall near sunset at Walltown / Hadrian's Wall is a World Heritage Site in the beautiful Northumberland National Park.
Campus map with a background of Students' Union Building at Newcastle University

Excellent schools

With a number of excellent state and independent schools, the North East can provide any child with a solid foundation for future career development. The city of Newcastle itself is home to two nationally recognised universities; Newcastle & Northumbria.

Campus map with a background of Students' Union Building at Newcastle University

A great nightlife

Known for it’s great nightlife, all within easy walking distance, the bars, clubs and pubs in Newcastle cater for any and all of our nightlife needs. From classy cocktail offerings to craft beer hangouts, cheesy student clubs to decadent gin bars; the bars, clubs and pubs in Newcastle cater for any and all.

Early evening on Newcastle Quayside, England
Newcastle upon Tyne in the atlas of the Europe

Short commutes and great transport

The city itself is just minutes away from unspoilt countryside and miles of stunning Northumbrian coast – the Lake District is just a two hour drive across the A69. Easy travelling all lead to an enviable lifestyle in the North East of England.

Newcastle upon Tyne in the atlas of the Europe

Living in Newcastle

Newcastle and the surrounding area offers a mixture of housing with something for every taste. House prices in the North East of England are much lower than most of the rest of the country, but housing in the area still offers quality, prestigious homes. There are a range of housing types, from modern contemporary riverside apartments on Newcastle’s vibrant quayside, to executive homes at Wynyard Village about 30 miles drive south of Newcastle. In surrounding Northumbria you can find many rural retreats, and the coastal areas provide substantial older character properties – from terraced houses to unique ‘Tyneside’ flats from the Victorian and Edwardian era.